192015Dec
Three diet and nutrition guidelines for EVERYONE

Three diet and nutrition guidelines for EVERYONE

Nutrition can be a hard thing to agree on. Fat, salt, carbs are all debated, not to mention throwing in terms like paleo, vegan and fad diets.

Completely simplifying the mystifying diet and nutrition world can be very dangerous, and we’ve found three guidelines that everybody seems to agree on. To be honest, you won’t find them surprising – but it is still important to see if you abide by them.

1. Minimise sugar

Is it bad for you, or really bad for you? That is the only debate. WHO has evidence that sugar = obesity and sugar = tooth decay, to the point they’ve suggested that no more than 10% of your daily caloric intake should come from sugar (ideally 5%). As a guide, a can of coke is 80% of that daily sugar. “Instead of that can of Coke, you could ‘spend’ the same number of calories on a glass of milk, a side salad, a handful of nuts or a few bites of a burger. Along with those calories, you’d get vitamins, protein or other useful nutrients.”

2. Avoid artificial trans fats

Linked to heart disease and possibly diabetes and obesity – it’s safe to say that this section is targeting those junk foods like fried food and mass produced cakes. They were originally created as a replacement for the saturated fats (which are now not so bad after all).

3. Vegetables are good for you

Easy. Are you surprised? They’ve been part of our diet since we were humans. They should occupy 50% of your plate. Every detox diet is heavy on the veggies. Leafy greens in particular are high in vitamins and fibre. Fruits almost sneak in here, but there is some debate about the amount of sugar they hold.

If you’re thinking about eating healthy, or want to weigh in with your two cents in discussion with friends and family, these are the best points to start with. Even in advertising you’ll notice they’ll try and sell you a diet plan or new blender based on the above ideas.

Look after yourself.

Green vegetables and dark leafy food background as a healthy eating concept of fresh garden produce organically grown as a symbol of health as kale swiss chard spinach collards broccoli and cabbage.

Green vegetables and dark leafy food background as a healthy eating concept of fresh garden produce organically grown as a symbol of health as kale swiss chard spinach collards broccoli and cabbage.

Thanks to Shutterstock for the photo and Lifehacker for the idea. I’m sure you’ll find someone willing to debate the three points suggested above, because you can’t please everyone – but these are about as close to a consensus as you will get!